SMART Recovery: What You Need to Know

If you (or someone you know and love) have a drug addiction, you will hit “rock bottom.” When that happens, the SMART Recovery program may look like a viable solution to your problem. But, at “rock bottom,” it’s difficult to make a decision that will impact the rest of your life as you know it.

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How to Prevent Relapse While in Recovery

When you engaged in long-term abuse of alcohol or drugs you may have damaged brain function. These damaged brain cells will not resolve in the early stages of sobriety. This is one contributing factor to relapse.

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Family Member Support Guide – The Stages of Family Involvement in Recovery

To see a loved family member, whether it is a child, a parent or a sibling, go through the struggles of a substance use disorder is painful. It can be easy to avoid the situation or pretend it isn’t that bad, but ultimately for the successful recovery of this loved one it is important for family to confront the issue, encourage treatment and to play active and supportive roles in recovery.

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Addiction and Psychosocial Development in Early Childhood

Substance abuse and addiction are very complicated issues, but contributing factors may be a result of poor, delayed or incomplete psychosocial development. Psychosocial skills and values, such as trust, self-identity, competence and purpose, are important for functioning normally within society.

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Hazing and the Medical Amnesty Act on College Campuses

In the U.S., many students enrolled in colleges and universities take part in a dangerous practice called binge drinking. Some of these students drink voluntarily, while others do so under coercion during a hazing ritual. Whatever the reason for binge drinking, the activity can lead to life-threatening alcohol poisoning and other serious problems.

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The Importance of Family in Recovery

When a person struggles with a substance use disorder, their family struggles too. Addiction is often called a family disease, because family dynamics contribute to and are affected by substance use. When families come together to support a loved one in recovery, and support each other, they can learn to change behaviors and enjoy a more positive and healthy home environment.

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Peer Recovery Advocates: Providing Continuing Care After Treatment

Peer Recovery Advocates: Providing Continuing Care After Treatment

Social support is an important part of recovery from substance use disorders. Anyone working an addiction treatment program can benefit from all types of social support, but the guidance of someone who has had similar experiences with drugs or alcohol is particularly powerful. Peer recovery advocates are in recovery themselves, and they devote their time—either as volunteers or as paid staff—to provide recovery services and social and emotional support to their peers.

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Preventing Drug Abuse Starts at Home with Parents

Parents tend to underestimate the power they have to affect their children’s lives, especially as they become teenagers and the influence of their peers grows. The truth is that for most young people, parents have the biggest impact on many aspects of their lives from their values to their health choices.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19): Response and Updates for Clients, Families, and Referents Read More