Accreditations

About CARF

Founded more than 40 years ago, the Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) is an international, independent, nonprofit accreditor of health and human services. CARF assists service providers in improving the quality of their services, demonstrating value, and meeting internationally recognized organizational and program standards. CARF’s mission is to ensure that the persons served by CARF-accredited facilities receive the best services and the most effective outcomes possible.

The accreditation process applies sets of standards to service areas and business practices during an on-site survey. Accreditation, however, is an ongoing process, signaling to the public that a service provider is committed to continuously improving services, encouraging feedback, and serving the community. Accreditation also demonstrates a provider’s commitment to enhance its performance, manage its risk, and distinguish its service delivery.

CARF is considered the premiere accrediting body for rehabilitation programs. Facilities that are CARF-accredited must meet stringent standards.

CARF accreditation is voluntary. This means that organizations seeking CARF accreditation spend their own time, money and efforts to undergo the in-depth assessment and review that CARF requires. The survey process is not centered on inspection but rather on consultation, where the CARF survey team works with the provider to improve service resources and outcomes.

CARF sees itself as a catalyst for enhancing the quality of life of the persons served by CARF-accredited organizations. It places particular emphasis on diversity and cultural competence in all CARF activities and associations. This contributes to what CARF sees as its core values: ensuring that all people have the right to be treated with dignity and respect; that all people have access to needed services that achieve optimum outcomes; and that all people be empowered to exercise informed choice.

CARF standards are continually developed and revised through a series of leadership panels, national advisory committees, focus groups and field reviews relying heavily on active involvement at all levels by persons served.

CARF standards are continually developed and revised through a series of leadership panels, national advisory committees, focus groups and field reviews relying heavily on active involvement at all levels by persons served.

How Accreditation is Achieved

Achieving accreditation requires a service provider to commit to quality improvement, focus on the unique needs of each person the provider serves, and monitor the results of services. A service provider begins the accreditation process with an internal examination of its program and business practices. Then the provider requests an on-site survey that will be conducted by a team of expert practitioners selected by CARF. During the survey, the provider must demonstrate that it conforms to a series of rigorous and internationally recognized CARF standards.

Based on the results of the survey, CARF prepares a written report of the provider’s strengths and areas for improvement. If a provider has sufficiently demonstrated its conformance to the standards, it earns CARF accreditation.

After receiving the report, the provider must submit a Quality Improvement Plan to CARF to show how it is addressing any areas for improvement. Then, each year during the term of accreditation, the provider must submit a report to CARF documenting additional improvements it has made.

The Survey Process

CARF offers several levels of accreditation, the highest being the Three-Year Accreditation. This indicates that the provider is meeting or exceeding CARF standards and will not need to be reviewed again for another three years. The second level is the One-Year Accreditation, which indicates that while there are still some existing deficiencies in conforming to CARF standards, the program shows capability and commitment toward correcting the deficiencies and making progress. The third level is known as Provisional Accreditation, which means the provider is still functioning at the One-Year level the following year, and has one year to correct the deficiencies and meet CARF standards or it will receive an outcome of non-accreditation.

What CARF Means for Clients and Referrers

According to CARF, organizations that have received accreditation demonstrate:

  • A higher degree of internal quality
  • Greater involvement of persons served in their treatment and services
  • Increased cohesion among staff members at all levels within the organization
  • Enhanced status of the surveyed services within the community

What this means is that when an organization is accredited, the public is assured that it is committed to continually improving the quality of its services and the organization’s focus is on service outcomes and customer feedback and satisfaction. In addition, CARF accreditation allows clients and referrers to compare programs on key areas such as durability of outcomes, cost-effectiveness, quality and consistency of care, patient satisfaction, qualifications of staff and all the other factors that influence a referral choice.

Why Accreditation Matters

Consumers face a variety of options when deciding what services to use and who should provide them. Accreditation is a sign of quality and is an important consideration in their decision-making. They look for CARF accreditation in their choice of treatment for addiction and substance abuse, rehabilitation of a disability, home and community services, retirement living, and other health and human services.

About The Joint Commission

Founded in 1951, The Joint Commission seeks to continuously improve health care for the public, in collaboration with other stakeholders, by evaluating health care organizations and inspiring them to excel in providing safe and effective care of the highest quality and value. The Joint Commission accredits and certifies nearly 21,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States. An independent, nonprofit organization, The Joint Commission is the nation’s oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. To earn and maintain The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval®, an organization undergoes an on-site survey by a Joint Commission survey team at least every three years.

What It Means to be Joint Commission Certified and Why It’s Important

The Joint Commission’s standards and emphasis on clinical practice guidelines help organizations establish a consistent approach to care, reducing the risk of error. Certification standards help organize the disease management program. This helps to maintain a consistently high level of quality, using effective data-driven performance improvement. Certification provides an opportunity for staff to develop their skills and knowledge. Achieving certification provides the clinical team with common goals and a concrete validation of their combined efforts.

How Accreditation is Achieved

Joint Commission reviewers have significant experience evaluating disease management programs. They are trained to provide expert advice and education on good practices during an on-site review. Organizations must demonstrate the ability to provide treatment that addresses the health needs of the whole person, potentially improving overall satisfaction with the care experience.

The Survey Process

Organizations undergo a rigorous on-site survey. During the review, a Joint Commission expert surveyor evaluates compliance with standards relating to key concepts of person-centered health care to support recovery and resilience philosophies. Meeting Joint Commission standards is an accomplishment recognized with the awarding of The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval™. Certified organizations proudly display the Gold Seal to demonstrate their commitment to health care quality.

What JCC Means for Clients and Referrers

Achieving certification makes a strong statement to the community about an organization’s efforts to provide the highest quality services. Clients can feel assured that they are choosing a reputable institution when it is Joint Commission Certified.

Why Accreditation Matters

Accreditation is a sign of quality and is an important consideration for clients in their decision-making. Accreditation allows clients and referrers to compare programs on key areas such as durability of outcomes, cost-effectiveness, quality and consistency of care, patient satisfaction, qualifications of staff and all the other factors that influence a referral choice. In some markets, certification is becoming a prerequisite to eligibility for insurance reimbursement, or participation for managed care plans and contract bidding.

About DCF

The Florida Department of Children and Families is committed to protecting the vulnerable, promoting strong and economically self-sufficient families, and advancing personal and family recovery and resiliency. Transformations Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center is licensed by the Department of Children and Family Services within the state of Florida.